Popular Mechanics - The Surgeon Will Skype You Now 5-15min

The tech for surgeons to operate on patients from hundreds or even thousands of miles away has been possible for over a decade. But will it ever become commonplace? ... real benefits, though, are for the patient. Thin, dexterous tools are precise over a large range of motion. For example, Tewari used the forceps to tie a series of knots with thin string to suture up his incisions, which makes it easier for surgeons to spare healthy tissue when cutting out an unwanted mass. Tewari says that at his hospital, the use of robots has cut the recovery time for prostate surgery from four days to just one or two. No surprise, then, that robotic procedures are more popular than ever. In 2010, 86 percent of prostatectomies were done with robots, and they are used to operate on hearts, kidneys, gallbladders, and ovaries. In 2012, 450,000 operations were done with robots, according to the Wall Street Journal. ... Some optimistic experts says it's only a matter of time until researchers fix the technical challenges that prevent doctors from operating from another state or country. But from cyber security to connection speeds to legal gray areas, there are a host of potential problems with remote surgery. Under the wrong conditions or in the wrong hands, surgical tools can do more harm than good. ... researchers found that the surgeons didn't notice if the lag time was less than 250 milliseconds. Higher than that, though, and their performance suffered no matter their level of surgical experience